Memorising quotes through pictograms

My Year 10 class have, mainly, been really struggling to remember quotes for the new GCSE English literature ‘closed book’ exams. Inspired by @Xris32 and his excellent recent blog on using pictograms to aid recall of language features I decided to try something similar with quotes.

As a big fan of cryptic puzzles, I decided to make some of my pictograms like Dingbats. If you haven’t heard of Dingbats before, here’s a cryptic take on a classic literary quotation that has stuck in my head since about 1986:

20160206_163619-1

Any ideas? Yes, it’s ‘One for all and all for one’. Neat eh? Well mine are nowhere clever as that – I’m a teacher and don’t have the time for starters – but they do, hopefully, have the same level of stickability. When I first tried these the pupils hardly got any and grumbled like mad. But the next time we did some they fared much better and recalled the ones they struggled with the previous week. We’re currently doing Romeo & Juliet, so here’s some examples that I made of quotes from Act 1 and Act 2:

Presentation1

Presentation2

Presentation3Presentation4

Answers on a postcard (or a tweet will suffice). Thanks for reading.

 

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